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26160 Anti-DNase B Titer, Serum (ADNAS)

Anti-DNase B Titer, Serum (ADNAS)
Test Code: ADNASSO
Synonyms/Keywords

​​ADB (Antideoxyribonuclease B), Anti-Dnase B, Antideoxyribonuclease, Antideoxyribonuclease B (ADB), DNA Streptococcal Antibody, DNase-B, Anti Streptococcal Antibodies, Serum ADNB

Useful For

Demonstration of acute or recent streptococcal infection using anti-DNase B titer.

Specimen Requirements
Fasting RequiredSpecimen TypePreferred Container/TubeAcceptable Container/TubeSpecimen VolumeSpecimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
​Yes-preferred​Serum​Red Top Tube (RTT)​Serum Separator Tube (SST)​1 mL​0.5 mL
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen TypeTemperatureTime
​Serum ​ ​​Refrigerate (preferred)​28 days
​Frozen​28 days
​Ambient​7 days
Rejection Criteria
Grossly Lipemic
Interference

​False-high titers may be obtained with sera that are contaminated by certain bacterial organisms during shipment or storage and in patients with liver disease where the presence of high lipoprotein concentrations in the serum may mimic antibody activity.

Performing Laboratory Information
Performing LocationDay(s) Test PerformedReport AvailableMethodology/Instrumentation
​Mayo Clinic Laboratories​Monday through Friday​1 to 3 daysNephelometry
Reference Lab
Reference Range Information
Performing LocationReference Range
​Mayo Clinic Laboratories

<5 years: < or =250 U/mL

5-17 years < or =375 U/mL

> or =18 years: < or =300 U/mL

Interpretation

Elevated values are consistent with an antecedent infection by group A streptococci. Although the antistreptolysin O (ASO) test is quite reliable, performing the anti-DNase is justified for 2 primary reasons. First, the ASO response is not universal. Elevated ASO titers are found in the sera of about 85% of individuals with rheumatic fever; ASO titers remain normal in about 15% of individuals with the disease. The same holds true for other streptococcal antibody tests: a significant portion of individuals with normal antibody titers for 1 test will have elevated antibody titers for another test. Thus, the percentage of false-negatives can be reduced by performing 2 or more antibody tests. Second, skin infections, in contrast to throat infections, are associated with a poor ASO response. Patients with acute glomerulonephritis following skin infection (post-impetigo) have an attenuated immune response to streptolysin O. For such patients, performance of an alternative streptococcal antibody test, such as this assay, is recommended.

Outreach CPTs
CPTModifier
(if needed)
QuantityDescriptionComments
​86215​1
Synonyms/Keywords

​​ADB (Antideoxyribonuclease B), Anti-Dnase B, Antideoxyribonuclease, Antideoxyribonuclease B (ADB), DNA Streptococcal Antibody, DNase-B, Anti Streptococcal Antibodies, Serum ADNB

Ordering Applications
Ordering ApplicationDescription
​Cerner​Anti-DNase B Titer, Serum (ADNAS)
​COM​Anti-DNase B Titer, Serum (ADNAS)
If the ordering application you are looking for is not listed, contact your local laboratory for assistance.
Specimen Requirements
Fasting RequiredSpecimen TypePreferred Container/TubeAcceptable Container/TubeSpecimen VolumeSpecimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
​Yes-preferred​Serum​Red Top Tube (RTT)​Serum Separator Tube (SST)​1 mL​0.5 mL
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen TypeTemperatureTime
​Serum ​ ​​Refrigerate (preferred)​28 days
​Frozen​28 days
​Ambient​7 days
Rejection Criteria
Grossly Lipemic
Interference

​False-high titers may be obtained with sera that are contaminated by certain bacterial organisms during shipment or storage and in patients with liver disease where the presence of high lipoprotein concentrations in the serum may mimic antibody activity.

Useful For

Demonstration of acute or recent streptococcal infection using anti-DNase B titer.

Reference Range Information
Performing LocationReference Range
​Mayo Clinic Laboratories

<5 years: < or =250 U/mL

5-17 years < or =375 U/mL

> or =18 years: < or =300 U/mL

Interpretation

Elevated values are consistent with an antecedent infection by group A streptococci. Although the antistreptolysin O (ASO) test is quite reliable, performing the anti-DNase is justified for 2 primary reasons. First, the ASO response is not universal. Elevated ASO titers are found in the sera of about 85% of individuals with rheumatic fever; ASO titers remain normal in about 15% of individuals with the disease. The same holds true for other streptococcal antibody tests: a significant portion of individuals with normal antibody titers for 1 test will have elevated antibody titers for another test. Thus, the percentage of false-negatives can be reduced by performing 2 or more antibody tests. Second, skin infections, in contrast to throat infections, are associated with a poor ASO response. Patients with acute glomerulonephritis following skin infection (post-impetigo) have an attenuated immune response to streptolysin O. For such patients, performance of an alternative streptococcal antibody test, such as this assay, is recommended.

For more information visit:
Performing Laboratory Information
Performing LocationDay(s) Test PerformedReport AvailableMethodology/Instrumentation
​Mayo Clinic Laboratories​Monday through Friday​1 to 3 daysNephelometry
Reference Lab
For billing questions, see Contacts
Outreach CPTs
CPTModifier
(if needed)
QuantityDescriptionComments
​86215​1
For most current information refer to the Marshfield Laboratory online reference manual.