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# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Strongyloides Antibody, IgG, Serum (STRNG)
Test Code: STRNGSO
Synonyms/Keywords

Strongyloidiasis

Strongyloides antibody

Strongyloides Hyperinfection

Useful For

Screen for the presence of IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides

This test may be used as a screen to determine exposure status to Strongyloides.

This assay detects IgG-class antibodies only.

This assay should not be used to monitor patient response to therapy as IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides may remain detectable following resolution of infection.

Specimen Requirements
Fasting Required Specimen Type Preferred Container/Tube Acceptable Container/Tube Specimen Volume Specimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
​No ​Serum ​Serum Separator Tube (SST) ​Red Top Tube (RTT) ​0.5 mL ​0.4 mL
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen Type Temperature Time
​Serum ​ ​Frozen ​30 days
​Refrigerate (preferred) ​30 days
Rejection Criteria
Gross hemolysis
​Gross icterus
​Gross lipemia
Interference

False-positive results may occur with other helminth infections, including prior exposure to Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris, Taenia solium, Fasciola species, Echinococcus species, Schistosoma species, and Toxocara (per assay manufacturer).

This assay should not be used alone to establish a diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Results should be correlated with other laboratory findings and through clinical evaluation.

False-negative results may occur during acute or localized infection. A single negative result should not be used to rule-out infection.

This assay should not be used to monitor response to therapy.

The seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis ranges from 0 to 6.1% in the United States.

Performing Laboratory Information
Performing Location Day(s) Test Performed Analytical Time Methodology/Instrumentation
​Mayo Medical Laboratories ​Monday, Wednesday, Friday ​1-4 days ​Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)
Reference Lab
Test Information
This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Medical Laboratories.
 
Strongyloidiasis is caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode endemic to tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. Strongyloides stercoralis is also prominent in the southeastern United States, including in rural areas of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and North Carolina. A small series of epidemiological studies in the United States identified that between 0 to 6.1% of individuals sampled had antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis.
 
Strongyloides stercoralis has a complex lifecycle that begins with maturation to the infective filariform larva in warm, moist soil. The larvae subsequently penetrate exposed skin and migrate hematogenously to the lungs, from where they ascend the bronchial tree and are swallowed. Once in the small intestine, filariform larva mature into the adult worms that burrow into the mucosa. Gravid female worms produce eggs that develop into noninfectious rhabditiform larvae in the gastrointestinal tract and are eventually released in the stool. The time from dermal penetration to appearance of Strongyloides in stool samples is approximately 3 to 4 weeks.
 
The most common manifestations of infection are mild and may include epigastric pain, mild diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. At the site of filariform penetration, skin may be inflamed and itchy- this is referred to as "ground itch." Migration of the larva through the lungs and up the trachea can produce a dry cough, wheezing, and mild hemoptysis. Eosinophilia, though common among patients with strongyloidiasis, is not a universal finding and the absence of eosinophilia cannot be used to rule-out infection.
 
In some patients, particularly those with a depressed immune system, the rhabditiform larvae may mature into the infectious filariform larvae in the gastrointestinal tract and lead to autoinfection. The filariform larvae subsequently penetrate the gastrointestinal mucosa, migrate to the lungs and can complete their lifecycle. Low level autoinfection can maintain the nematode in the host for years to decades. Among patients who become severely immunocompromised, however, autoinfection may lead to hyperinfection and fatal disseminated disease. Hyperinfection has also been associated with underlying human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Uncontrolled, the larvae can disseminate to the lungs, heart, liver, and central nervous system. Septicemia and meningitis are common in cases of Strongyloides hyperinfection due to seeding of the bloodstream and central nervous system with bacteria originating from the gastrointestinal tract.
Reference Range Information
Performing Location Reference Range
​Mayo Medical Laboratories ​Negative
Interpretation

Positive: IgG antibodies to Strongyloides were detected, suggesting current or past infection. False-positive results may occur with other helminth infections (eg, Trichinella, Taenia solium). Clinical correlation is required.

Negative: No detectable levels of IgG antibodies to Strongyloides. Repeat testing in 10 to 14 days if clinically indicated.

Outreach CPTs
CPT Modifier
(if needed)
Quantity Description Comments
​86682 ​1
Classification
This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Medical Laboratories.
Synonyms/Keywords

Strongyloidiasis

Strongyloides antibody

Strongyloides Hyperinfection

Ordering Applications
Ordering Application Description
​Centricity ​Strongyloides Antibody, IgG, Serum (STRNG)
​Cerner ​Strongyloides Antibody, IgG, Serum (STRNG)
​COM ​Strongyloides Antibody, IgG, Serum (STRNG)
If the ordering application you are looking for is not listed, contact your local laboratory for assistance.
Specimen Requirements
Fasting Required Specimen Type Preferred Container/Tube Acceptable Container/Tube Specimen Volume Specimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
​No ​Serum ​Serum Separator Tube (SST) ​Red Top Tube (RTT) ​0.5 mL ​0.4 mL
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen Type Temperature Time
​Serum ​ ​Frozen ​30 days
​Refrigerate (preferred) ​30 days
Rejection Criteria
Gross hemolysis
​Gross icterus
​Gross lipemia
Interference

False-positive results may occur with other helminth infections, including prior exposure to Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris, Taenia solium, Fasciola species, Echinococcus species, Schistosoma species, and Toxocara (per assay manufacturer).

This assay should not be used alone to establish a diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Results should be correlated with other laboratory findings and through clinical evaluation.

False-negative results may occur during acute or localized infection. A single negative result should not be used to rule-out infection.

This assay should not be used to monitor response to therapy.

The seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis ranges from 0 to 6.1% in the United States.

Useful For

Screen for the presence of IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides

This test may be used as a screen to determine exposure status to Strongyloides.

This assay detects IgG-class antibodies only.

This assay should not be used to monitor patient response to therapy as IgG-class antibodies to Strongyloides may remain detectable following resolution of infection.

Test Information
This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Medical Laboratories.
 
Strongyloidiasis is caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode endemic to tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. Strongyloides stercoralis is also prominent in the southeastern United States, including in rural areas of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and North Carolina. A small series of epidemiological studies in the United States identified that between 0 to 6.1% of individuals sampled had antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis.
 
Strongyloides stercoralis has a complex lifecycle that begins with maturation to the infective filariform larva in warm, moist soil. The larvae subsequently penetrate exposed skin and migrate hematogenously to the lungs, from where they ascend the bronchial tree and are swallowed. Once in the small intestine, filariform larva mature into the adult worms that burrow into the mucosa. Gravid female worms produce eggs that develop into noninfectious rhabditiform larvae in the gastrointestinal tract and are eventually released in the stool. The time from dermal penetration to appearance of Strongyloides in stool samples is approximately 3 to 4 weeks.
 
The most common manifestations of infection are mild and may include epigastric pain, mild diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. At the site of filariform penetration, skin may be inflamed and itchy- this is referred to as "ground itch." Migration of the larva through the lungs and up the trachea can produce a dry cough, wheezing, and mild hemoptysis. Eosinophilia, though common among patients with strongyloidiasis, is not a universal finding and the absence of eosinophilia cannot be used to rule-out infection.
 
In some patients, particularly those with a depressed immune system, the rhabditiform larvae may mature into the infectious filariform larvae in the gastrointestinal tract and lead to autoinfection. The filariform larvae subsequently penetrate the gastrointestinal mucosa, migrate to the lungs and can complete their lifecycle. Low level autoinfection can maintain the nematode in the host for years to decades. Among patients who become severely immunocompromised, however, autoinfection may lead to hyperinfection and fatal disseminated disease. Hyperinfection has also been associated with underlying human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Uncontrolled, the larvae can disseminate to the lungs, heart, liver, and central nervous system. Septicemia and meningitis are common in cases of Strongyloides hyperinfection due to seeding of the bloodstream and central nervous system with bacteria originating from the gastrointestinal tract.
Reference Range Information
Performing Location Reference Range
​Mayo Medical Laboratories ​Negative
Interpretation

Positive: IgG antibodies to Strongyloides were detected, suggesting current or past infection. False-positive results may occur with other helminth infections (eg, Trichinella, Taenia solium). Clinical correlation is required.

Negative: No detectable levels of IgG antibodies to Strongyloides. Repeat testing in 10 to 14 days if clinically indicated.

For more information visit:
Performing Laboratory Information
Performing Location Day(s) Test Performed Analytical Time Methodology/Instrumentation
​Mayo Medical Laboratories ​Monday, Wednesday, Friday ​1-4 days ​Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)
Reference Lab
For billing questions, see Contacts
Outreach CPTs
CPT Modifier
(if needed)
Quantity Description Comments
​86682 ​1
Classification
This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Medical Laboratories.
For most current information refer to the Marshfield Laboratory online reference manual.