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25424 Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin, Adult (CDTA)

Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin, Adult (CDTA)
Test Code: MISC
Synonyms/Keywords

​CDT (Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin), Transferrin for Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin (CDT), Transferrin Isoforms

Useful For

An indicator of chronic alcohol abuse

This test is not appropriate for screening patients for congenital disorders of glycosylation.

Highlights:

Patients with chronic alcoholism demonstrate increased levels of carbohydrate deficient transferrin over the amount of normally glycosylated tetrasialotransferrin.

Specimen Requirements
Fasting Required Specimen Type Preferred Container/Tube Acceptable Container/Tube Specimen Volume Specimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
No​ ​Serum ​Red Top Tube (RTT) ​Serum Separator Tube (SST) ​0.5 mL ​0.1 mL
Collection Processing Instructions
​1. Patient's age is required. Reason for referral is required if patient is <21 years old.
2. This test is for evaluation of alcohol abuse. If the ordering physician is looking for congenital disorders of glycosylation, order CDG / Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin for Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, Serum.
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen Type Temperature Time
​Serum ​ ​ ​Frozen (preferred) ​45 days
​Refrigerate ​28 days
​Ambient ​7 days
Interference

​This assay has not been fully validated for the investigation of alcoholism.

Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) testing alone is not recommended for general screening for alcoholism. Analysis of more than 1 biomarker is recommended to avoid misinterpretation of results.

The abnormal transferrin isoform pattern in patients with chronic alcoholism is similar to that observed in congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). However, unlike most patients with CDG, the relative amount of monoglycosylated transferrin is much lower. Other conditions such as hereditary fructose intolerance, galactosemia, and liver disease may result in increased levels of CDT. In addition, preanalytic variables such as bacterial contamination may cause falsely elevated CDT values. Several factors may cause variability in CDT analysis, including: ethnicity, gender, pregnancy, body mass index, smoking, blood pressure, iron metabolism, drug interactions, chronic medical illness.

Performing Laboratory Information
Performing Location Day(s) Test Performed Report Available Methodology/Instrumentation
Mayo Clinic Laboratories​ ​Wednesday ​7 to 10 days Affinity Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (MS)
Reference Lab
Test Information

Chronic alcoholism causes a transient change in the glycosylation pattern of transferrin where the relative amounts of disialo- and asialotransferrin (carbohydrate deficient transferrin: CDT) are increased over the amount of normally glycosylated tetrasialotransferrin. This recognition led to the use of CDT in serum as a marker for chronic alcohol abuse.

CDT typically normalizes within several weeks of abstinence of alcohol use. However, it is important to recognize that there are other causes of abnormal CDT levels, which include congenital disorders of glycosylation and other genetic and nongenetic causes of acute or chronic liver disease.

CDT testing alone is not recommended for general screening for alcoholism; however, when combined with other methods (ie, gamma-glutamyltransferase, mean corpuscular volume, patient self-reporting, ethylglucuronide analysis), clinicians can expect to identify the majority of patients who consume a large amount of alcohol.

Reference Range Information
< or =0.10
0.11-0.12 (indeterminate)
Interpretation
​Patients with chronic alcoholism may develop abnormally glycosylated transferrin isoforms (ie, carbohydrate deficient transferring: CDT >0.12). CDT results from 0.11 to 0.12 are considered indeterminate.
 
Patients with liver disease due to genetic or nongenetic causes may also have abnormal results.
Outreach CPTs
CPT Modifier
(if needed)
Quantity Description Comments
82373​
Synonyms/Keywords

​CDT (Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin), Transferrin for Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin (CDT), Transferrin Isoforms

Ordering Applications
Ordering Application Description
If the ordering application you are looking for is not listed, contact your local laboratory for assistance.
Specimen Requirements
Fasting Required Specimen Type Preferred Container/Tube Acceptable Container/Tube Specimen Volume Specimen Minimum Volume
(allows for 1 repeat)
Pediatric Minimum Volume
(no repeat)
No​ ​Serum ​Red Top Tube (RTT) ​Serum Separator Tube (SST) ​0.5 mL ​0.1 mL
Collection Processing
​1. Patient's age is required. Reason for referral is required if patient is <21 years old.
2. This test is for evaluation of alcohol abuse. If the ordering physician is looking for congenital disorders of glycosylation, order CDG / Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin for Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, Serum.
Specimen Stability Information
Specimen Type Temperature Time
​Serum ​ ​ ​Frozen (preferred) ​45 days
​Refrigerate ​28 days
​Ambient ​7 days
Interference

​This assay has not been fully validated for the investigation of alcoholism.

Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) testing alone is not recommended for general screening for alcoholism. Analysis of more than 1 biomarker is recommended to avoid misinterpretation of results.

The abnormal transferrin isoform pattern in patients with chronic alcoholism is similar to that observed in congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). However, unlike most patients with CDG, the relative amount of monoglycosylated transferrin is much lower. Other conditions such as hereditary fructose intolerance, galactosemia, and liver disease may result in increased levels of CDT. In addition, preanalytic variables such as bacterial contamination may cause falsely elevated CDT values. Several factors may cause variability in CDT analysis, including: ethnicity, gender, pregnancy, body mass index, smoking, blood pressure, iron metabolism, drug interactions, chronic medical illness.

Useful For

An indicator of chronic alcohol abuse

This test is not appropriate for screening patients for congenital disorders of glycosylation.

Highlights:

Patients with chronic alcoholism demonstrate increased levels of carbohydrate deficient transferrin over the amount of normally glycosylated tetrasialotransferrin.

Reference Range Information
< or =0.10
0.11-0.12 (indeterminate)
Interpretation
​Patients with chronic alcoholism may develop abnormally glycosylated transferrin isoforms (ie, carbohydrate deficient transferring: CDT >0.12). CDT results from 0.11 to 0.12 are considered indeterminate.
 
Patients with liver disease due to genetic or nongenetic causes may also have abnormal results.
For more information visit:
Performing Laboratory Information
Performing Location Day(s) Test Performed Report Available Methodology/Instrumentation
Mayo Clinic Laboratories​ ​Wednesday ​7 to 10 days Affinity Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (MS)
Reference Lab
For billing questions, see Contacts
Outreach CPTs
CPT Modifier
(if needed)
Quantity Description Comments
82373​
For most current information refer to the Marshfield Laboratory online reference manual.